Sunday, 15 May 2016

My Richard III talk at WDYTYA? Live now on YouTube

You can now view the talk I gave in Birmingham last month at the WDYTYA? Live event on YouTube. This version is slightly modified from that presentation and the one I gave to BIFHSGO last October, as it had to be rerecorded owing to excessive background noise. That means there is no audience interaction.

The talk explains the likelihood ratio technique that was used to determine whether or not the remains found in a car park in Leicester were those of Richard III, that DNA testing was not essential for the remains to be given full honours when they were reinterred in Leicester Cathedral, and how the technique can be employed to quantify confidence more generally in genealogy.

Thanks to Maurice Gleeson for organization of the event and placing the video on YouTube, to Debbie Kennett for the initial invitation to participate in the series organized for the International Society for Genetic Genealogy and to Family Tree DNA, the sponsors.

Don't overlook the other videos from this and previous WDYTYA? DNA events at www.youtube.com/channel/UC7HQSiSkiy7ujlkgQER1FYw

5 comments:

Wendy Croome said...

And you got an excellent review by Maurice Gleeson on the ISOGG Facebook page. I feel privileged to have heard the talk at BIFHSGO. Thank you.

Gail B said...

watched it twice, second time with my spouse who works in the field of probability theory, confirmation bias and statistics. Very impressive. Sent to other friends and relatives who are academics, one pro. genealogist and an archeologist. May you have many more 'hits' on viewing.

Gail B

Linda Reid said...

I enjoyed watching your presentation. This is the first time I have heard mention of just how common/uncommon Richard's mtDNA haplogroup is. That, to me, is an important consideration in evaluating how significant the mtDNA matches with his sister's descendants are. Thanks.

JDR said...

Linda: How common/uncommon the mtDNA is in the general population is important. I recommend reading the original article, and supplementary information, at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/141202/ncomms6631/full/ncomms6631.html

Debra Dudek said...

Thanks for posting this webinar! It was very interesting and insightful!