Monday, 23 July 2018

YouTube: Software & Tools for Genetic Genealogy

Now posted on YouTube, a two part presentation by Maurice Gleeson given in Auckland, New Zealand (not Durham).

The first part deals with autosomal DNA

The one-liner worth taking away to that any match over 100 cM is worth exploring. Aside from known relatives I have no matches that large. However, I have found relatives by matching surnames and places with people who whom I share less than 100 cM.

The second deals with Y-DNA

The Canadian Merchant Navy War Dead Registry


Veterans Affairs Canada has a searchable index to the names of seamen who were killed while serving in Canada's Merchant Marine. The date range I found was 1915 to 1947.
These mariners should also be found in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission records, which typically have a bit more information. For common names it may be easier to find them in the VAC database.

The VAC database can also be used to search for the names of 625 Canadian Merchant Navy vessels on which they served.

The photo is courtesy of TripAdvisor.

Sunday, 22 July 2018

Sunday Sundries

Miscellaneous items I found of interest during the week.

BBC Reith Lectures
Managing the Unmanageable
In the fourth lecture for 2018 historian Margaret MacMillan assesses how the law and international agreements have attempted to address conflict. Speaking to an audience at the Northern Irish Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast, Professor MacMillan outlines how both states and the people have sought to justify warfare - from self-defence to civil war - focusing on examples from Irish and British history.

Land of the Lost: Digital Projects and Longevity
Digital permanence and historical digital projects. - includes a list of 16 Favourite Digital Projects and 4 Chronic Offenders (CBC Digital Archives, Canadiana, Library and Archives Canada,
Virtual Museum of Canada’s older Community Stories).

Why Digital Archives Expand Access and Awareness
Top Tips for Research Trips: Making the Most of Your Visit to the Archives
The Home Guard
Do you really need to properly eject a USB drive before yanking it out?
Illiberal, authoritarian government .. China and the USA
PBS Announces Fall 2018 Primetime Schedule
Omega 3 supplements don’t protect against heart disease – new review
How sweet it isn't

Saturday, 21 July 2018

Lancashire parish records on Findmypast

Lancashire parish records are now in Findmypast's collection.

Baptisms, 1538 to 1917
Over 1.1 million baptism register records from 191 Lancashire parishes. See a transcript and an image of the original register.

Banns & Marriages, 1538 to 1932
Covering 194 Lancashire parishes, containing over 713,000 records the transcript and image of the original register give a combination of the couples' names, birth years, occupations, marriage date, marriage location, parents' names, father's occupations and the names of any witnesses and whether married by banns or licence.

Burials, 1538 to 1991
For 123 parishes and over 712,000 records, these burial records, transcripts and images, show name, where the burial took place, as well as age at the time of death.

These collections of Lancashire parish baptisms, marriages, banns and burials provided by Lancashire Archives are also available to browse.

Ancestry has Lancashire parish records too.

You can stay in touch with developments at the Lancashire Archives through their newsletter.

Did you know the Lancashire Archives has an online search capability for the names of police officers, particularly those who served with the Lancashire County Constabulary from the force's inception in 1840 up to 1925?

Discover: the Magazine of the National Library of Scotland

The Summer issue of this free magazine is now online.

It's in three sections the third of which includes "Latest online maps and resources: Charting the country’s historic tourist, road and rail routes"



Friday, 20 July 2018

The Call to Duty: Canada's Nursing Sisters - a Co-Lab Challenge

Letters, diaries and photographs of four Canadian nursing sisters who served during the Great War are now available for LAC Co-Lab transcription.

Follow these nurses as they witness the destruction of war, participate in social events, and help patients, as you transcribe, translate, tag and/or describe their writings and photographs.

The material available is from:
Sophie Hoerner, born Montreal she served with 15 Canadian General Hospital, 
Dorothy Cotton, born Kingston she served at 3 General Hospital,
Ann E Ross, born Kingston she served in Greece and England, and
Ruby Peterkin, born Toronto she served with the 5 British General Hospital and 4 General Canadian Hospital.

Canadian BMDs in Irish civil registration

FamilySearch just added Ireland Civil Registration, 1845-1913 with 2,009,643 events. It has birth records for the period 1864-1913, marriages for 1845-1870, and deaths for 1864-1870. These are indexes, no images.
FmilySearch has had since June 2015 an Ireland Civil Registration Indexes, 1845-1958 collection which has 23,023,320 events.
I notice this new collection includes quite a few events in the US and Canada! If you're missing a BMD registration for an Irish person overseas the new collection may be somewhere you'd want to look.
Are these an Irish version of the consular records, RG 32 to 36 from the UK National Archives, found in Ancestry's UK, Foreign and Overseas Registers of British Subjects, 1628-1969?


Thursday, 19 July 2018

Findmypast and Living DNA partnership

It's announced. Both companies are British. Individually they have strength the other can't match so they're a good complement.

The FAQ includes the rationale.

Why has Findmypast chosen to partner with Living DNA now?
We’ve made every effort to find a DNA company to partner with that provides the most benefit for those looking to explore their British and Irish roots. The unique British and Irish regional breakdown Living DNA provides makes this possible, perfectly combining with our unrivaled collection of British and Irish historical records. It’s this powerful combination that makes this partnership the perfect marriage of science and history.

Hopefully the partnership will bring Living DNA clients more than ancestral regions. The ability to connect with living relatives has been long promised. The announcement claims that's COMING SOON. "Our intuitive matching system will take the hard work out of building a family tree. You can even contact living relatives if you both choose to do so. All at no extra cost."


Surnames Resource

Curious about the surnames in your family tree? There are lots of resources, especially from the Guild of One-Name Studies and now that DNA surname studies are well established.
I recently came across retired University of Winnipeg geographer Howard Mathieson’s Geography of Surnames website devoted to the study of English, Scottish and Irish surnames.
Going along the ribbon, after the introduction which shows his pedigree as a geographer there are sections on place and occupational surnames. Under Surname Themes there are sections on distinctive Cornish, Welsh and Border Reiver surnames, and for Ireland Ulster and Norman origin names.
Recommended Reading — 14 useful references.

Check out the drop-downs under "Odds and Ends".
  • The Scotland Parish Atlas is a Google Earth research tool which brings together finding aids for Scottish genealogy. You download a .kmz file which opens as a Google Earth overlay. It shows county and parish boundaries and over 2,000 links to external web pages relating to Scottish genealogy.
  • The Highland Clearances
  • Cartographic Astrology — why Origenes is nonsense.
  • The Monastic Atlas and Gazetteer of Ireland — a Google Earth download
  • Population change in Ireland — famine maps
  • Size can be deceiving!

Genealogy moves further online

Have you noticed the trend?

The Virtual Genealogical Association, founded on 27 April 2018 as the Virtual Genealogical Society, aims to provide a forum for genealogists to connect, network, and mentor with genealogists around the world through monthly meetings online, webinars, social networking, annual conferences, and in-person meet-ups at conferences, institutes and events around the world.

Active since June 2018 the VGA is offering 3 webinars a month, a three day virtual conference at the start of November (extra cost, discount for members) and other benefits for $20 US annual fee.

The Québec Genealogical eSociety, launched in January 2018, provides a virtual environment enabling members to:

  • participate and share in their genealogical research.
  • network with other genealogists.
  • pursue their growth as genealogists, either by coaching others or by being coached.
  • conduct continuous improvement and development of best practices in the discipline of genealogy.
There is a monthly webinar and access to the BMS2000 and the PRDH databases. A 1 year membership is $45 Cdn.

DNA Central was created in 2017 and 2018 by Blaine Bettinger to help educate the millions of people taking DNA tests every year. Present offerings are:
  • 10 self-guided DNA courses, with more coming soon! 
  • Bi-weekly newsletter with the latest news & developments! 
  • Growing webinar and short video library!
DNA Central aims to become THE premiere location for DNA education of all kinds, with articles, newsletters, videos, webinars, and much more! Annual Membership is $99 US.

Active since October 2014 so not as new an initiative, The Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research offers courses on a wide variety of genealogical subjects, consisting of:
  • six hours of instruction from a (US) nationally recognized expert
  • extensive syllabus material
  • practical exercises
Also offered are occasional webinars. 
There is no membership fee, each course or webinar is individually priced.

Don't overlook online resources available free or as part of the membership of more established organizations — you may already be a member.