Wednesday, 4 September 2019

Forthcoming "Genealogy" books

A search for genealogy on Amazon.co.uk lists the following as to be published before the end of the year. Information is from the publisher.

How to Trace Your Irish Ancestors 3rd Edition: An Essential Guide to Researching and Documenting the Family Histories of Ireland's People
by Ian Maxwell | 5 Sep 2019
The purpose of this book is to highlight the most important documentary evidence available to the family historian wishing to research their Irish ancestry. It is aimed primarily at researchers whose time in Irish repositories is limited, and who want to know what is available locally and online. It covers more than eighteen individual sources of information, making it simpler to organise your search and easier to carry it out both locally and on the ground.
This books covers:
- Where to begin
- Researching online
- Civil registration
- Making sense of census returns, wills, election records
- Migration, emigration
- Local government and church records

The Family Tree Scandinavian Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Ancestors in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
by David A Fryxell | 8 Oct 2019
Highlights include:
Strategies for identifying immigrant Scandinavian ancestors, plus how to trace them back to Europe from North America
Methods for locating Swedish genealogy records, Norwegian genealogy records, or Danish genealogy records within your family's town of origin
Detailed guides to finding and decoding common Scandinavian records, including: church records, civil registration records, census returns, property deeds, military records, and many more
Quick guides to Scandinavian history, geography, and language
Historical timelines, sample records, and resource lists that will bring your family history to life

Tracing Your Ancestors in Lunatic Asylums: A Guide for Family Historians
by Michelle Higgs | 30 Oct 2019
How can you trace forebears who were patients in lunatic asylums and find out about their lives? What sources can you consult to discover their personal histories and gain an insight into their experiences? In this concise, accessible handbook, Michelle Higgs answers these questions. She provides a fascinating introduction to the subject and gives readers the means to explore the records for themselves. She concentrates on the period from the eighteenth century through to 1948 when the National Health Service was founded and looks in particular at the Victorian era which is the most popular period for research. Using original records, contemporary accounts, photographs, illustrations and case studies of real individuals, she brings the story of the asylums and their patients to life. Different types of institution are described such as private madhouses, county lunatic asylums, facilities for idiots and imbeciles, and military mental hospitals. Chapters look at the admission procedures and daily routine of patients, plus different kinds of mental illness and how they were treated - for instance, those with depression or mania, criminal lunatics, mothers with puerperal insanity, epileptics and soldiers suffering from shell shock. There are sections on the systems in Scotland and Ireland, as well as England and Wales. Information is provided on all the relevant sources, from wills and the census to casebooks and admission and discharge registers.

Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry through Church and States Records: A Guide for Family Historians
by Chris Paton | 30 Nov 2019
Despite its Union with England and Wales in 1707, Scotland remained virtually independent from its partners in many ways, retaining its own legal system, its own state church, and its own education system. In Tracing Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records, genealogist Chris Paton examines the most common records used by family historians in Scotland, ranging from the vital records kept by the state and the various churches, the decennial censuses, tax records, registers of land ownership and inheritance, and records of law and order. Through precepts of clare constat and ultimus haeres records, feudalism and udal tenure, to irregular marriages, penny weddings and records of sequestration, Chris Paton expertly explores the unique concepts and language within many Scottish records that are simply not found elsewhere within the British Isles. He details their purpose and the information recorded, the legal basis by which they were created, and where to find them both online and within Scotland's many archives and institutions.


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