Monday, 5 September 2016

The True Story of the Lederhosen Guy?

You've seen the lederhosen ad. Is their a grain of truth in it about swapping lederhosen for a kilt because of a DNA test?

Check out "What my DNA had to say, and how it took me to LA", then decide if it's credible

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

That was a hoot John. I loved the bit about a 102 year old woman giving birth. Yes, it's smart to be suspicious of anything posted by anyone until you verify it yourself.
But recently I made contact with the Fiennes family here in the UK. Their history does go w-a-y back, to before the arrival of William the Conquerer. One family member arrived with him, and a distant cousin was an adviser to King Harald on the side of the English ..... I have just finished reading Mad Dogs and Englishmen: An Expedition Around my Family, by Sir Ranulph Fiennes, the internationally known explorer, who raises millions of pounds for charities in his work. Fascinating reading. And available used, cheap, on Abebooks.com. Cheers, BT

Gail B said...

What a hoot. That is absolutely the most enjoyable ancestry tale I have read in over 40 years of reading them. Thanks for this, John.

Gail B

Sue LaFlamme said...

Loved the Lederhosen Guy story. I've seen that commercial and laughed, but now the joke is on me. I have seen a number of articles and bloggers comment that Ancestry.com's admixture percentages are wrong. I had my brother tested at FamilyTreeDNA and I tested at Ancestry.com. I got the most bang for my buck with Ancestry. When I first got my results, I was well and truly pissed off because it said I was 22% Irish. Nooooo, I am all Scottish on my mother's side....or so I thought. I started nosing around on the Internet to see if there were any Irish in Megantic County, Quebec where my grandmother was born in 1900 and within an hour I had the paper trail. In all the Canadian censuses I found, both paternal and maternal great-grandparents and further back, reported their ethnicity as Irish. I have also found birth, marriage and death records for them as well. This Irish business was not known to anyone in my family. In fact, my 4th great-grandfather James Suitor was born in Londonderry, Ireland in 1763 and came to Quebec around 1830. Furthermore, a man named Steve Cameron has written 2 books about the Irish in Quebec in the 19th century and one whole chapter deals with James Suitor and his sons who were tried and convicted of murder over a land dispute. This summer I traveled to Quebec to meet Mr. Cameron, who took my son and I to all the places he wrote about involving my ancestors. I would have known NONE of this had I not tested with Ancestry.com. The ethnicity report looks about right to me--just the 7% Iberian peninsula is a mystery. Best $99 I've spent!

Sue LaFlamme said...

Loved the Lederhosen Guy story. I've seen that commercial and laughed, but now the joke is on me. I have seen a number of articles and bloggers comment that Ancestry.com's admixture percentages are wrong. I had my brother tested at FamilyTreeDNA and I tested at Ancestry.com. I got the most bang for my buck with Ancestry. When I first got my results, I was well and truly pissed off because it said I was 22% Irish. Nooooo, I am all Scottish on my mother's side....or so I thought. I started nosing around on the Internet to see if there were any Irish in Megantic County, Quebec where my grandmother was born in 1900 and within an hour I had the paper trail. In all the Canadian censuses I found, both paternal and maternal great-grandparents and further back, reported their ethnicity as Irish. I have also found birth, marriage and death records for them as well. This Irish business was not known to anyone in my family. In fact, my 4th great-grandfather James Suitor was born in Londonderry, Ireland in 1763 and came to Quebec around 1830. Furthermore, a man named Steve Cameron has written 2 books about the Irish in Quebec in the 19th century and one whole chapter deals with James Suitor and his sons who were tried and convicted of murder over a land dispute. This summer I traveled to Quebec to meet Mr. Cameron, who took my son and I to all the places he wrote about involving my ancestors. I would have known NONE of this had I not tested with Ancestry.com. The ethnicity report looks about right to me--just the 7% Iberian peninsula is a mystery. Best $99 I've spent!