Sunday, 14 April 2019

Sunday Sundries

Miscellaneous items I found of interest during the week.

Ancestry Improves Public Profile and Messaging
If you have a public profile for your Ancestry account, and if you use the messaging application to communicate with matches you'll find changes, mostly improvements being made in the next few days, if not already.

Book Review: Orphans of Empire
"The spirit of William Hogarth runs vividly through Orphans of Empire, Professor Helen Berry’s latest book, which explores the story of what happened to the orphaned or abandoned children of London’s Foundling Hospital ... the brainchild of Thomas Coram."

Rage Against the Machines (pdf)
A study of the Swing Riots of the 1830s in England using digitized newspapers brings new insights to the diffusion of the threshing machine and severe labour unrest in wheat-growing areas which was mitigated in parishes where more generous Poo Poor Law support was provided.
The pdf was a very slow download.

Methodist History
Links at www.myprimitivemethodists.org.uk/, www.mywesleyanmethodists.org.uk/ and www.mymethodisthistory.org.uk — a tip from Jane MacNamara who was impressed with the content and usability. BTW: check out Jane's blog Where the story takes me… for well researched Ontario posts back to 2012.

Google Search Refinement
You can now limit your results from a Google search by adding before:yyyy and/or after:yyyy, or get more precise using dd/mm/yyyy.

Google's Amnesia
Google seems to have stopped comprehensively indexing the internet for its Search. Certain old websites — those more than 10 years old — may not show up through Google search. Lifehacker suggests alternatives. BTW, if you're concerned about the lack of privacy on Google try DuckDuckGo — not as good as Google but pretty good.

Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds
From the New Yorker. It's from 2017 so some of the "current" references are dated.


2 comments:

Anonymous said...

"where more generous Poo Law" --what?

Anonymous said...

Another alternative to Google is Ecosia. The company uses its profits to plant trees, and the site says that one tree is planted for every search. But I don't think the results are quite as comprehensive as Google's.